Glass in the garden

One of the reasons I love visiting the Franklin Park Conservatory in Columbus, Ohio, is the Chihuly glass.  For those inquiring minds that want to know, you are allowed to take photographs as long as you are not going to sell the photographs.  I have promised not to sell them, and I make a grand total of absolutely nothing on my blog, so I won’t be profiting from them in any way.

Don’t forget to look up. You’ll find displays in some of the ceiling areas.

Now that I’ve settled all that…

You can find Chihuly glass almost everywhere you look inside of the Franklin Park Conservatory.  I’m not sure if there is any out on the grounds or not.  I have not really had a chance to explore the grounds too much.

If you’ve been visiting me here at Life in the Bogs or over at my other blog, you’ll have seen some of these glass sculptures in the past.  I tried to mix it up a little, and take photos from different angles this time.  I also went for close-ups on some of the bigger pieces rather than capture the whole.

We were fortunate enough to be there for the Blooms & Butterflies exhibit (which runs from March 10 – September 3, 2012).  Beautiful butterflies were flitting around the Pacific Island Water Garden, a lot of them sitting on a rather large Chihuly glass sculpture.  I’m not sure if they were drawn by the color or if it’s just a safe place to sit, away from people.

Little Miss Maddy (my youngest granddaughter) enjoyed the butterflies very much.  She also enjoyed the flowers, and the fish in the ponds.  I don’t think she was too impressed with the Chihuly glass.  At the very least, she didn’t find it as interesting if it happened to be empty of butterflies.

One of the many good things about visiting the conservatory with Maddy is that it limited my photography.  I was too busy watching her, and enjoying her delight in the butterflies, fish, and flowers.  Plus Maddy has been there several times before so she knows her way around.  Having a three-year-old for a guide and a companion is a wonderful way to see fish, flowers, and butterflies.

We’re having a gray Monday here in the Bogs so it’s nice to look at all this color.  There are scattered thunderstorms in the forecast, most of which will probably occur tonight.

The bullfrogs were partying last night.  It is obviously mating season.  In case there are any doubts about the cause of all the croaks and gronks and bonks, all you have to do is have a look along the edges of the pond where you will find bullfrog eggs floating on the surface of the water.

That’s it from the Bogs for today.  Thanks for dropping by.  It’s warm and humid enough to make this a good day to go for a swim or at least sit on the swim dock and dangle your feet in the water.  Keep an eye on the sky.  You don’t want to get caught out there during a storm.  The lightning has been pretty spectacular lately, but it’s best seen from indoors.

Advertisements

52 Comments on “Glass in the garden”

  1. God, that glass is stunning, Robin. And I’m glad to know I’m not the only one making the big, blogging bucks! Somebody’s gotta be poor, right?
    Hugs,
    Kathy

  2. We saw his work at Kew Gardens in London, when the boys were small we all loved it especially the floating sculptures on the lake, pre digital photography I’m afraid… I’d love the chance to photography it now.

  3. Oh I do so love Chihuly exhibits in park and garden settings. Those reds and yellows next to the greens are amazing. Thank you so much for sharing the whole experience.

  4. Gracie says:

    Oh wow! These are amazing! I can see why you love going back there, I would too!

  5. Anita Mac says:

    Very cool glass. It is amazing what they can do. Love the vibrant colours in your photos.

  6. Dana says:

    These are incredible, Robin! I’ve never seen glass like this before, and the butterflies are an added bonus, too.

    • Robin says:

      The butterflies were indeed an added bonus, Dana. I would have liked to capture more of them, but given a choice between Maddy and photographing butterflies, Maddy always wins. 🙂

  7. milkayphoto says:

    Oooooh, lucky you! Just last week, GMA featured this event on their show. Chihuly’s work is amazing. I hope, one day, to see it in person.

    • Robin says:

      I hope you do get to see it, Tracy. You’ll love it. I was just looking at the list of places that have permanent collections of Chihuly’s work, and was surprised to find none in the New England states.

  8. Aren’t these the greatest? They were at Phipps in Pittsburgh a few years ago. As a photographer, you can have great fun playing with the color hue & saturation in Photoshop, as the colors are so clear and definite.

    • Robin says:

      They are wonderful, Lynn. Does Phipps have a permanent collection? I’m sure I’ll be visiting Pittsburgh frequently now that I have family there, and Phipps is already on my list of places to visit. Seeing more of Chihuly’s works would be an added bonus. 🙂

  9. Elisa's Spot says:

    what a very nice noticing treat as I sit eating supper and calming my system!

  10. mobius faith says:

    I love Chihuly’s work. I gotta see this exhibit. Wonderful photos.

    • Robin says:

      Thank you, Terry. 🙂

      If you do go, be sure to visit the Columbus Museum of Art as well. They have a few Chihuly pieces, too.

  11. Fantastic images. So much colour…so much excitement!!

  12. Becky says:

    Stunning! Love that little butterfly hanging out on the glass. 🙂

  13. judithhb says:

    Thanks for sharing this Robin. I had never heard of Chihuly glass and so I Googled it. And I am totally blown away with the Persian Ceiling shown on Wikipedia. Plan to find out more about this fantastic artists. Again, thanks and thanks.

  14. Maggie L R says:

    beautiful and colourful. I saw some of his work in Las Vegas, He has a gallery there. He is so talented and creative with his glass work.

  15. aFrankAngle says:

    Love the ceiling glass, which actually reminded me of diatoms. – then again, I must be in a “relating” mood of some sorts because my first thought on the opening pic was “Cool Gummy candy.” … of which I know better. Great color!!!

  16. TBM says:

    I love the visual feast here…so vibrant and mysterious.

  17. jane tims says:

    Hi Robin. Your photos add to the sculptural beauty of the glass. The glass bubbles in the water are inspiring… I think glass bubbles in greens and blues would be lovely in any pond. Jane

  18. The library in San Antonio has one of these glass sculptures suspended from the ceiling. It was a donated art piece – huge and magical. Seeing these amid plants and water is equally amazing – such colors, light, and (what else can you say?) magic.

  19. Corina says:

    Beautiful photos, Robin. I’m hoping to go to the new exhibit at the Seattle Center when it opens later this month. It’s supposed to be the largest exhibit of Chihuly glass in the world. I’ve never seen Chihuly glass, except in photos, so I’m looking forward to the opportunity, hopefully this summer when I go visit my son.

    • Robin says:

      Thank you, Corina. 🙂

      I do hope you get there. Seeing the glass in person is so much better than anything captured by a camera.

  20. His glass artwork is on display at the Dallas Arboretum right now, too! Hopefully I get to go see it up close 🙂

  21. Robin says:

    That’s how I feel about the glass too, Sallyann. 🙂

  22. sherri says:

    this plant is like something from another planet. so beautifully photographed.

  23. eof737 says:

    Yep… when I first glimpsed it, I thought Chihuly! His glass works are breathtaking! 🙂


Thank you for visiting, and for commenting. I hope you'll join me at my new blog home, Breezes at Dawn.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s