The town of Harpers Ferry

(Historical marker. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

I feel so far behind these days that I may never catch up. I’m still trying to keep the blog up to date as part of our record of things we’ve done, but we keep so busy that I don’t have time to do the record keeping.

Let’s see how far I can get today.

In case I haven’t mentioned it before (and I’m too lazy to go back and look), the town of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia is a National Historical Park. I don’t know how usual or unusual that is across the country, but it’s the first time I’ve visited a National Historical Park that encompassed an entire town.

Our first stop after enjoying the views from the Hilltop Hotel was the Visitor’s Center which is located a little ways outside of the main part of town. There is a $6.00 vehicle fee for entering the park. It’s good for three days.

At the Visitor’s Center we looked at the maps in order to decide which hike we’d like to take. After gathering a few maps, we hopped on the shuttle that takes you into the lower part of the town of Harpers Ferry. This turned out to be a very good idea as parking on a Saturday would have been difficult. The shuttle is free (or part of the vehicle fee if you’d like to look at it that way). The main part of Harpers Ferry that was dead on a Friday night was hopping on a gorgeous Saturday. Businesses were open and there were people wandering around everywhere.

(From the shuttle stop. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

One of the interesting things about the town is that some of the businesses are real and some are museum mock-ups of businesses from the 19th century, where you can peer inside but you can’t actually go inside.

(Walking up the main street in Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

(On the main street in Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

Whether real businesses or not, it makes for a quaint little town.

(On the main street in Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

The first hike we decided to take was a hike which takes you from the lower part of Harpers Ferry to the upper part. This, of course, involved climbing.

(Stairs in Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

The stairs in the photo above were hand carved by the townspeople to make it easier to go from the lower part of town to the upper part.  I’m not sure when they were carved.  But it was at least 100 years ago.
Our first top was the church at the top of the hill which was open to the public so we could go inside to have a look around. M and I both enjoy touring churches, admiring the architecture and stained glass windows. Plus M is a big fan of organs and churches are good place to find them.

(The church organ. Harpers Ferry, WV. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

(One of the stained glass windows in the church. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

Inside and outside of the church were women dressed in period costumes. I’m not sure what period. This woman was kind enough to pose for me:

(Photo by Robin. September 2007)

From the church we continued going up the side of the mountain where we had a great view of the town.

(View from the church. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

Our next stop was a church ruin:

(Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

(Harpers Ferry. Photo by Robin. September 2007)

I wish I could remember more of the history of what we saw. Unfortunately the map and brochure we brought home don’t help me with specifics and I haven’t found the internet to be particularly helpful, either. For instance, the church above is labeled “Local Church” on the few websites that picture it. I’m sure the church has a name — St. Somebody. I just can’t remember who.

Next stop: Jefferson’s Rock.


One Comment on “The town of Harpers Ferry”

  1. Alto2 says:

    I haven’t been in Harper’s Ferry since I was a little girl. It is as beautiful as I remember.


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