Valley Forge

(Valley Forge National Historical Park. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

Shortly before noon yesterday M phoned and asked if I’d like to go do something. It was so nice outside after the rain moved through, and he was at a standstill at work, waiting for some supplies, so to speak.

We decided to go to Valley Forge National Historical Park. We’d both been there on school field trips as kids, but I don’t really remember much about it. I think it’s a terrible shame that all those good field trips were wasted on me during a time when I least appreciated them: Childhood. M and I have retraced a few of those school field trips since we’ve been back east and I can’t for the life of me figure out why I thought all this stuff was boring. Now I’m finding it all fascinating. I’m enjoying learning some of the history I should have learned when I was in school had I been paying attention (a little nod to Whad’Ya Know? there).

We started at the Welcome Center, always a good place to start. We picked up a map, had a quick look around at some of the exhibits, and then headed out for a 6-mile walk/hike around the park.

(Valley Forge National Historical Park. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

It was a beautiful day for a hike. Sunny, warm but not hot, with a good strong breeze that kept us relatively cool. Most of the walk went through areas that provided occasional shady spots which also helped to keep us cool. The last mile or so of the walk was the most brutal because there were no shady spots and it felt as though the sun was beating down on us. We were also getting pretty tired by that time and ready to finish the walk.

(When you’re unsure again? Redoubt, VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

I’m going to skip the history lesson. You can visit the website (link provided above) for that if you should so desire. I did find it interesting that some of what I’d learned and/or thought about the encampment at Valley Forge was more myth than fact.

Here are a few photos:

(Somewhere near the beginning of the trail. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Mount Joy. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Cabin. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

The cabins, which are scattered throughout the park, are not the original cabins built during the encampment in Valley Forge in 1777-1778. They are, of course, reproductions.

(Cabins. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Sleeping arrangements. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(National Memorial Arch. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(More cabins. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Part of Wayne’s Woods. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

One of the wonderful things about the day and the photographs is the play of light and shadow that was going on with the clouds occasionally blocking the sun. In some instances, such as the photo below, the light was perfect.

(Anthony Wayne. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Meadow. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Artillery Park. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Along the trail. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Stone schoolhouse. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

The one-room schoolhouse was built about 35 years after the Revolutionary War encampment at Valley Forge.

(Meadow. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(Can you tell I enjoyed the meadows? VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

One of the things I was unable to capture with the camera was the way the wind created waves through the grass in the meadows. It was a beautiful sight.

(Count Dracula. Nah. It’s Baron Friedrich von Steuben. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

(White-tailed deer. VFNHP. Photo by Robin. June 2007)

There are deer almost everywhere in the park, some of whom are not exactly shy. I read that they have a white-tailed deer management problem and that they’re currently trying to solve it. I wonder if the deer population now is higher than during the encampment? I’m guessing it probably is.

That’s probably enough of Valley Forge. I took 219 photos, most of them of the meadows. I’m sure you don’t need to see them all.

Today has turned out to be another good day for a walk. We’re off to Longwood Gardens again this afternoon to see what changes have occurred over the past couple of weeks.


2 Comments on “Valley Forge”

  1. Norm says:

    Thanks for taking us on tour once again and, as always, for your excellent photos.

  2. […] is dedicated to two local men who were members of Wayne’s brigade (remember Wayne from the Valley Forge entry?), Colonels Isaac Taylor and Joseph […]


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